Psychosis and Institutional Racism

Event Details

Psychosis and Institutional Racism

Time: November 13, 2018 from 1pm to 5pm
Location: Amnesty International UK
Street: 25 New Inn Yard
City/Town: London EC2A 3EA
Website or Map: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/…
Phone: admin@ispsuk.org
Event Type: one, day, conference
Organized By: ISPS UK
Latest Activity: Sep 22, 2018

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Event Description

Institutional racism is sometimes viewed as the elephant in the room in mental health and psychosis. We know that people from racialised minorities are more likely to be diagnosed with schizophrenia, more likely to be subject to the Mental Health Act, and more likely to be restrained or be under a Community Treatment Order. And yet- it seems to many working or campaigning in the field that we have failed to address these issues, and that too little has changed over the past few decades.

How do start talking about and addressing institutional racism, when so often it can feel invisible or taboo? How does institutional racism affect people who use services, but also family members and carers, and professionals (psychiatrists, psychologists, nurses, OTs, HCAs etc) who deliver services? What are the barriers which stop us talking about it - and how do we address what we struggle to recognise?

This day will encourage discussion & reflection on how institutional racism plays out in the field of psychosis, from multiple perspectives. We will reflect on how we can name it, and how, together, we can start to find ways of addressing it.

Keynote Speaker:

Dr Suman Fernando, Honorary Professor, Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, London Metropolitan University and former (retired) consultant psychiatrist

Unfortunately, due to a scheduling conflict, Guilaine Kinouani will not be able to speak as originally advertised. We will keep you posted on new speakers.

Speakers:

Dr Philip Thomas and Dr Alison Faulkner on the Privilege, Partiality and Power of Whiteness

Sara Haq on Complex Subjectivities and Survival Strategies for Collective/Cultural Psychosis

Dr Colin King

Other speakers tbc

Followed by ISPS UK AGM, 17.00-17.30

All are welcome to attend

Details of the day:

Coffee and lunch will be provided. Please contact us if you have any questions about the day or access.

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