What does DUCIE do?

The DUCIE network aims to:

  • provide support, and help meet the needs for continuing professional development, of involvement workers employed in HEIs
  • share and disseminate good practice and examples of existing posts and initiatives
  • provide opportunities for debate and the teasing out of complex areas of practice
  • develop good practice guidelines on the involvement of users and carers in learning and teaching in higher education (building on work begun with the Learning from Experience guide),  the establishment of involvement worker posts, and development of a context in which they can flourish.
  • act as a central point of contact for national initiatives, such as the Mental Health in Higher Education project, seeking to engage with users and carers involved in learning and teaching in Higher Education
  • act as a campaigning and pressure group

Activities:

  • DUCIE guidelines for the employment of service user and carer involvement workers in higher education.
  • Ian Light Award for work in pairs
  • DUCIE jiscmail discussion list (with 60+ members)

See here for

Background to the network:

See also this longer extract from a recent book

In the summer of 2005, a small band of user and carer involvement development workers, based in Higher Education Institutions, met over two days in Nottingham.   They had in common that they were fairly newly appointed to posts with the aim of facilitating user and carer involvement in education for health and social care.   Lively discussion was accompanied by a shared sense of optimism and enjoyment in the possibilities of these new roles.  They were seen to pose significant challenges too.

Some of the issues related to the cross-cutting nature of the work.  Workers made reference to the need to ‘juggle too many balls' or ‘spin too many plates at once'.  They spoke of ‘wearing lots of different hats' and the complexity of ‘working with different voices'.  There was a real sense of people being pulled in a number of different and sometimes opposing directions; a set of challenges which will be familiar to anyone who might be considered a ‘boundary spanner' (Williams 2002). 

Other key issues were around hidden agendas, lack of clarity in what is expected of the role and tokenism; with one worker describing ‘being parachuted in to rubber stamp things'.   For some the role felt unstable, reflecting temporary or part-time contracts and ‘inadequate resources'.  One worker felt they were precariously ‘standing on tip-toes'; another in a state where they felt they were ‘about to be rained on'. Most could identify with the ambient fear of getting things wrong.

Two statements from the meeting stand out for me. When asked to describe a picture they had drawn of themselves in role, one person said "I'm trying to push the main door open when it seems that service users and carers are only allowed in through a little door that is open at the side!'. Whatever progress may already have been made in involving service users and carers in education and engaging with communities, ‘pushing the main door open' can be a major task. The second image relates to tensions involved in work that breaks new ground. "It's a challenge" one worker said "not being a this or a that"; with colleagues always seeming able to assert much clearer, established and accepted role identities.

   

Supported by the Mental Health in Higher Education (mhhe) project, but with a remit that goes beyond mental health, the DUCIE network meets two to three times a year and has proved a means for the sharing of expertise and experience between those employed in development worker roles. 

 

Blog Posts

CAIPE twitter chat on service user and carer involvement in IPE

Posted by Jill Anderson on August 14, 2017 at 16:46 0 Comments

The Centre for Advancement of Interprofessional Education has scheduled a twitter chat on 24th August from 7-8pm (UK time).

The following questions will be posted during the twitter chat hour.

1.      What are your experiences of learning from patients, service users and carers in IPE?  What did you learn from them?

2.      How much power should service users have in IPE?

3.      What role, if any, do service users have to play in IPE post qualification?

4.      If…

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How human givens differs from other therapy approaches

Posted by gemma chapman on August 14, 2017 at 16:20 0 Comments

How human givens differs from other therapy approaches

People often ask how the human givens (HG) approach differs from other therapeutic approaches. Indeed, we were asked by the Professional Standards Authority when the HGI register was being assessed for accreditation. This is what we told…

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Nature and wellbeing - links

Posted by Jill Anderson on August 14, 2017 at 8:29 0 Comments

Following the CCrAMHP meeting in Lancaster on 11 August, we created a collection of links on nature and wellbeing.  Many of these relate to the local area but there are some more general links as well, so am posting the URL in case of interest. 

View the collection here.

Mind Our Minds - a learning resource

Posted by Jill Anderson on August 7, 2017 at 15:30 0 Comments

Mind Our Minds aims to make sure UK citizens are provided with mental health services that give everyone that uses them a good quality service when they need them.

They have produced some 'patient opinions' which may be of use in informing learning and teaching, and would welcome feedback.  See here: …

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Surviving Work in Healthcare: helpful stuff for people on the frontline

Posted by Jill Anderson on August 7, 2017 at 10:54 0 Comments

The book takes as its starting point the crisis of healthcare in the UK: impossible health targets managed through command and control management and a stomach-churning rise in racism, whistleblowing and victimisation in the NHS. The use of nationally set productivity targets combined with austerity cuts have increasingly put clinical best-practice into direct conflict with funding. Health targets have become politically controlled, and performance has become a cynical exercise in ticking…

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A drop of sunshine

Posted by Jill Anderson on August 6, 2017 at 9:00 0 Comments

Published on 8 Oct 2014 'this film takes a controversial and contrarian view towards recovery from schizophrenia, proposing that the only treatment that can work is one where the so-called ‘patient’ is encouraged and empowered to become an equal partner in the process of healing'. Directed by Aparna Sanyal.

VIEW THE FILM

A useful teaching resource?  Respond in comments below if you have used it.

Creativity and Social Support in Mental Health: Service users' perspectives

Posted by Jill Anderson on August 2, 2017 at 9:43 0 Comments

This book weaves together service users' lived experiences of mental health recovery and ideas about how creative activities such as art, music, and creative reading and writing can promote it, particularly within social and community settings.

Find out more.

Two books about depression

Posted by Jill Anderson on July 28, 2017 at 22:06 0 Comments

Ordinarily well: the case for antidepressants

In Ordinarily Well, the celebrated psychiatrist and author Peter D. Kramer examines the growing controversy about the popular medications. A practicing doctor who trained as a psychotherapist and worked with pioneers in psychopharmacology, Kramer combines moving accounts of his patients' dilemmas with an…

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Reflecting on Threshold Concepts: an introductory tool

Posted by Jill Anderson on July 26, 2017 at 21:00 0 Comments

Threshold concepts are ideas or ways of looking at things that enable a deep grasp of something in the world; the phrase ‘threshold’ signifies the crossing that a learner is enable to make between superficial knowledge and a deeper and irreversible understanding. The Threshold concepts introductory tool is for anyone wishing to understand and apply a cluster of ideas around threshold concepts and the learning that occurs when students encounter troublesome ideas that transform their…

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